‘Etruscan Miniatures’ by Tim Cumming

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- I love poets who are also visual artists – it brings something extra to their work. Tim Cumming, who was born in an orphanage and grew up in the West Country in England, is a film-maker and painter as well as a poet. This beautiful chapbook, produced by an Australian publisher,…

‘mimesis, synaptic’ by Laressa Dickey

-Reviewed by Andrew Bailey- So it turns out one way to incline this reviewer positively to your book is to pack it like the sweets I used to get from the corner shop. We know this thanks to Miel, from whom a pamphlet arrived that I wanted to praise even before seeing it, simply because…

‘The Syllabus of Errors’ by Ashley Stokes

-Reviewed by Elinor Walpole- Described as ‘Twelve stories of obsession, loss and getting in a state’ Ashley Stokes’s The Syllabus of Errors is a collection of unnerving tales about people struggling to cope with their disappointments. Having read Stokes’s ‘The Swan King’ in the process of reviewing Unthology #2 for Sabotage in 2011 and found…

‘Static Cling’ by Cathleen Allyn Conway

-Reviewed by Éireann Lorsung- Cathleen Allyn Conway’s chapbook Static Cling  begins with a quotation from The Mistress Manual about the presumed universality of the demand for ‘Girls’ to be ‘nice’ and of the effect on those ‘Girls’ of that ‘nice’ness. In full, the quotation reads, “Whatever your personal situation, you were raised in a culture that…

Cerise Press: Fall/Winter 2012-13 (Vol. 4 Issue 11)

-Reviewed by Harry Giles-   One of the things I appreciate most about web journals is their architectural nature: where a book is a linearly curated experience, themes developing more or less rationally, a well-built website is more obviously a co-curation between editor and reader, with multiple pathways and directions of reading readily available. Every…

‘limite désir’ by Meghan McNealy

-Reviewed by Éireann Lorsung- Roland Barthes, in The Pleasure of the Text (my version is the 1975 Miller translation), writes that “Neither culture nor its destruction is erotic; it is the seam between them, the fault, the flaw, which becomes so” and, a bit later on the same page, declares that from this distinction we might …

‘Tusitala of white lies’ by Iain Britton

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- I was interested in this chapbook, by a New Zealander, because of the potential of  its culturally different image-base, approach and perception, and also because the physicality of the chapbook is  satisfyingly aesthetic. Immediately, the title arouses curiosity. What is Tusitala? It is, Google advises, both the name for a spider,…