deanna

Home – curated by Deanna Rodger (The Roundhouse Last Word Festival, 28/05/15)

– reviewed by Lettie McKie – The Hub As part of the Last Word Festival of spoken word, the Roundhouse transformed one of their unique circular spaces into a comfy hub for informal performances and discussion. With sofas, soft lighting and projected video art installations, the hub was comfy and welcoming. Deanna Rodger described the hub…

Unknown

Peter Hughes, Cultural eXchanges (De Montfort University, 25 Feb 2015)

-Reviewed by Sally Jack– Beloved of brides, the rhyme ‘something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue’ came to mind during a reading by Peter Hughes at this year’s Cultural eXchanges festival held at Leicester’s De Montfort University. Hughes – poet, artist, translator and teacher as well as publisher at Oystercatcher Press – read from…

can't care won't care

Can’t Care, Won’t Care by Sophia Walker

– reviewed by James Webster – Sophia Walker‘s Can’t Care, Won’t Care is a brilliantly traumatic show. Walker reaches into your guts with powerful, grasping words and twists until the tears squeeze out of your eyes. It’s hard to sit through; achingly, emotionally, superbly written and performed. Harrowing would be a good word. It’s cleverly…

asking nicely

Asking Nicely by Hannah Chutzpah

  – reviewed by James Webster – Asking Nicely is a thoroughly entertaining and insightful piece by Hannah Chutzpah that dissects the ways we ask for and are given permission with near-surgical accuracy. She skilfully breaks down the power and privilege that condition our language and behaviour, crafting a convincing argument from anecdote, poetry, quotations…

shame

Shame by John Berkavitch

– reviewed by James Webster – Shame is a highly ambitious and well-realised multi-disciplinary show. Created by John Berkavitch, this genre-bending show blends theatre, spoken word, hip hop, physical theatre, music and animation into a dizzying and highly accomplished performance. It begins with Berkavitch asking the audience the question ‘what are you most ashamed of’,…

wingman

Wingman by Richard Marsh

– reviewed by James Webster – Richard Marsh‘s two-man poetry play is a marvel of wit and emotion. Like all good comedies, the gags flow thick and fast, rich with wit and dexterous wordplay. What makes it a great comedy is that the jokes are rooted in deep and powerful emotion, as Marsh twines together…