9781905208289_Dazzle_Ship_300

Dazzle Ship by Isabel Galleymore

– Reviewed by Jessica Traynor – ‘Dazzle ships’ were WWI ships camouflaged with bright trompe l’oeil patterns designed to bewilder the enemy. Isabel Galleymore’s debut pamphlet has an accordingly fractured perspective, zooming in and panning out to dizzying, illuminating effect. Dazzle Ship heralds the arrival of an idiosyncratic new voice, and is full of dense, intricate poems.…

download (1)

The Month In Which We Are Born by Danielle Susi

-Reviewed by Nicole Rollender- Danielle Susi’s 12-poem chapbook, The Month In Which We Are Born, pays careful attention to the physical and immaterial trails we leave behind – “footprints and fingerprint fossils left in dust.” There’s an echoing concern throughout the poems – will we be recognized in the traces we’ve left, if they’re altered?…

IMG_1450

The Germ #1 and #2 (ed. Jonny Bruce)

 -Reviewed by Billy Mills- The original Germ was an organ of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Subtitled ‘Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art’, the journal featured poetry by the Rossettis and others, as well as essays on art and writing by members and friends of the Brotherhood. The first issue appeared in 1850 but the…

funeralsthronescover

Funerals & Thrones by JD Scott

-Reviewed by Erik Kennedy- For the poet of faith, the bedroom is a chapel, a hermit’s cave, a sanctuary; for the poet of desire, it is a bower of bliss, a cultic centre of fancy and aphrodisia, an eroto-grotto. For JD Scott, in the thirty poems of his second chapbook, Funerals & Thrones (Birds of…

9781909136335

Cutting Up the Economist by Clive Birnie

-Reviewed by David Clarke- Clive Birnie’s pamphlet Cutting up the Economist is the result of a five year project in which the author created cut-ups of headlines and contents pages from the eponymous news magazine in order to produce poems which reflect on the economic upheavals of the period 2009-2014. The poems are presented against…

poetrybingosmall

Poetry Bingo by Maria Taylor

-Reviewed by Harry Giles-   Poetry Bingo is, most obviously, a game. Each of Maria Taylor’s four cards features a traditional 7×4 grid with 16 carefully-selected poetic moves – from thousand-dollar words (“shards”, “breast”) to formatting conceits (“strike-through”, “…”), from structural ploys (“very long clever title”, “stirring epigraph”) to hard-to-find absurdities (“wolf-love”, “custard”). Taylor imagines…