Jenalyn Marianne Villnueva

Jenalyn by Marianne Villanueva

-Reviewed by Holly Jazz Kotzé- Jenalyn is the eponymous story of a young woman from the Philippines and before I go any further with this review, I would just like to say, reading this just a week after the super-tornado Haiyan, how pertinent it is. In the story Jenalyn and her family are from the…

sad robot stories Mason Johnson

Sad Robot Stories by Mason Johnson

-Reviewed by David Sheridan- Whew. Just let me sit down a second, catch my breath. Whew, okay, yeah. That was Mason Johnson’s Sad Robot Stories, a free PDF (donation if you’re feeling so inclined) published by the Chicago Centre for Literature and Photography, and absolutely nothing to do with any other sad stories featuring robots…

Evie and Guy Dan Holloway cover

Evie and Guy by Dan Holloway

-Reviewed by David Sheridan- In one interview, Dan Holloway revels in the moment when a member of his reading group told him: ‘the emperor has no clothes’ – because that’s what people always say about conceptual art. He concludes, therefore, that he must be doing something right with Evie and Guy, his numbers-only ‘novel’. I…

The Ruins by Danny Broderick

‘The Ruins’ by Danny Broderick

-Reviewed by Ian Chung- Published as a Kindle Single on Amazon by Dead Ink, Danny Broderick’s The Ruins is a short story whose impact primarily derives from how it subverts the reader’s expectations regarding certain storytelling genres. The narrative begins in media res as a sort of spy thriller: ‘The woman was stripping the prisoner,…

In Conversation with Robert James Russell

-Robert James Russell spoke to Ian Chung- Author Bio: Robert James Russell is a Pushcart Prize-nominated author and the co-founding editor of the literary journal Midwestern Gothic. His work has appeared in Joyland, The Collagist, Gris-Gris, Thunderclap! Magazine,, and LITSNACK, among others. Sea of Trees (Winter Goose Publishing, 2012) is his first novella. What inspired…

‘The Middle’ by Django Wylie

-Reviewed by Nick Sweeney- The Middle is a short, powerful book about journeys, both actual and metaphorical, through hope and failure, but ultimately towards the suggestion, at least, of some kind of redemption. The characters, a boy – actually in his late teens – a man who feels the breath of middle age on his…

‘Controller’ by Sally Ashton

-Reviewed by Richard T. Watson- In the absence of words and common language, much of human communication happens through non-verbal means: body language, gestures and looks, for example. So it seems right that Sally Ashton’s debut novella, Controller, which follows its protagonist into an alien and foreign city whose language she learns as she goes…