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Faber New Poets 14 by Crispin Best

– Reviewed by Colin Herd – There’s more to Crispin Best’s Faber New Poets pamphlet than bagels and doughnuts, but they do tend to come up. There’s his recent tweet “retweet if you hold your bagel like this and think the government is bad” alongside an image of a finger hooped through a bagel, and a…

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Deerhart by Yvonne Reddick

– Reviewed by Grant Tarbard – I am writing this review in the corpse of the night, so let’s rip through it: Yvonne Reddick’s recent research focuses on British environmental poetry, working on a book-length study of Ted Hughes from an environmental perspective. Deerhart is filled to the gills with rock pools, life in miniature, rutting stags, and the…

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MAKE IT GNEW: Malkin by Camille Ralphs

-Reviewed by Dominic Hale– Malkin is Camille Ralphs’ astonishing and idiosyncratic debut pamphlet. Beautifully illustrated by publisher Emma Wright (The Emma Press), the sequence takes its title from the name of the Lancashire home of Elizabeth Southerns and her granddaughter Alizon Device, two women accused of witchcraft during the notorious Pendle Witch Trials of 1612. Styled…

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Semblance by Sarer Scotthorne

– Reviewed by Emma Lee – In Semblance, Sarer Scotthorne presents poems on the discipline, internal strength and knowledge gained through training in martial arts. They appear in English alongside Albert Zhang’s Mandarin and Cantonese translations. Full marks to erbacce for doing this: my language skills don’t allow me to comment on the translations, but I…

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Tongues of Fire by Jane Burn

– Reviewed by Grant Tarbard – I first encountered Jane Burn as an illustrator: her wonderful artwork lit up the page and made the accompanying poems sing like a Swainson’s Thrush. Her artwork is very well known in the UK’s poetry community, for it is as beautiful as it is layered, but she is also a renowned writer who…

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Dissolve to: LA – Action Movie Poems by James Trevelyan

– Reviewed by Jenna Clake – In James Trevelyan’s DISSOLVE to: L.A., poems are voiced by the minor characters of 1980s and ’90s cult action films. Trevelyan gives space for the unheard to speak their minds, resulting in dynamic, confessional and angry poems. ‘Lloyd’ introduces some of the over-arching themes of the pamphlet: They gave me a…