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Trouble by Alison Winch

– Reviewed by Jessica Traynor – Alison Winch’s Trouble is published by the Emma Press, and is an object befitting the quality of the work inside: beautifully designed and approachable, these pamphlets beg to be picked up and perused. A glowing introduction by Sarah Howe also proves enticing. Winch is a lecturer in Media Studies, and her…

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Echolocation by Becky Cherriman

– Reviewed by Edward Ferrari – Dr Teika Bellamy of Mother’s Milk Books has made some tremendously good design decisions with Becky Cherriman’s Echolocation: a minimalistic, but expertly composed cover image, and skilful use of two contrasting fonts, make this volume very attractive. It’s gratifying that an equal amount of attention must have been given to editing the poems…

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Hammersmith by Sean O’Brien

– Reviewed by Charlie Baylis – Sean O’Brien is “one of the most important poets currently writing in English” (does anyone know the dark knights behind this importance index?). I note O’Brien’s importance simply because I have never read him before, aside from some of the reviews he writes for The Guardian (which I think…

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Unnecessarily Emphatic by Kathrine Sowerby

– Reviewed by Elizabeth Rimmer – Unnecessarily Emphatic was first published in August 2015 and reprinted in January 2016 by Red Ceilings Press, who produce e-books and limited edition chapbooks (very limited – only thirty-five copies of this one). They seem to specialise in the weirder outposts of poetry, and I am therefore delighted to see…

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White Hills by Chloe Stopa-Hunt

– Reviewed by Charles Whalley – In White Hills, Chloe Stopa-Hunt writes with strange grandeur and evident faith in a special provenance and purpose for poetry. Whilst many contemporary poets gain much from having a coke with Frank O’Hara, White Hills recalls things pressed and dried between the pages of books, rather than the life we…

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Glass by Elisabeth Sennitt Clough

– Reviewed by Jenna Clake – The Glass of Elisabeth Sennitt Clough’s title appears in many ways throughout her pamphlet: a glass collar, a patio door, contact lenses. From the first poem, however, it is clear that simple reflections on glass aren’t the focus: this is a reflection on the fragility of family, and in…

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Otmoor by David Attwooll & Andrew Walton

– Reviewed by Katy Lewis Hood – Otmoor traces a history of engagement with and within a particular place, combining art and poetry to make a patchwork of intersecting fields. Echoing the Oxfordshire floodplains of its title, this pamphlet tests out a fluid, protean aesthetic within forms of enclosure. These forms range from medieval lyric…