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The Quilted Multiverse by Jill Munro

– Reviewed by Charlie Baylis – Jill Munro’s advice to new poets is “don’t give up the day job”, which makes perfect sense in the context of her role as director of a financial advice company. However, I fear the boredom that clock punching and the daily grind can have on a freshly-painted butterfly mind.…

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All the Water all the Waves by Kallie Falandays

– Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey – According to Carolyn Forché, ‘One cannot transcend trauma. Trauma is trapped and clings to that which happened. We live not after trauma, but in its aftermath.’ In the untitled prose poems of All the Water all the Waves, an unnamed woman is profoundly alienated from herself, wishing for death: This isn’t what…

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The Muddy Banks by Michael S. Begnal

– Reviewed by Peter O’Neill – There is a wonderful similitude at work in Michael S. Begnal’s The Muddy Banks, between the structure of the Point Bridge in the poem ‘1877 Point Bridge’, which opens this chapbook, and the formal composition of the poem, which is divided into three parts, each one made up of five…

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Çekoslovakyalilaştiramadiklarimizdanmisiniz or Long Words by Nia Davies

– Reviewed by Ryan Ormonde – Long words betray a push-and-pull tension in speech: if used too frequently, they slow down comprehension. If dispensed with altogether, what remains are spluttering staccato phrases attempting to form the already formed, grasping after the specific. Then there are very, very long words. Unusable oddities, their purpose seems satirical – a warning against…

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Euclid’s Harmonics by Jonathan Morley

– Reviewed by Harry Buckoke – Euclid’s Harmonics is named after a lost text by the translator, physician and educator Philemon Holland. Holland lived and worked in the city of Coventry, which is the central focus of the collection. Jonathan Morley takes time to detail Holland’s approach to translation, at once erudite and, in his own…

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Blueprints for a Minefield by Shauna Robertson

– Reviewed by James O’Leary – “The day we met, I started work on the axe.” The opening poem of Shauna Robertson’s Blueprints for a Minefield begins with a killer first line and ends with a payoff that gave me chills. This first poem gives powerful context to the pamphlet’s curious title, sets the tone for what’s to…

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Ol Donyo Ebor: Climbing the Mountain by Luigi Marchini

– Reviewed by JPL – Of all self-published books, Ol Donyo Ebor: Climbing the Mountain is the one to buy, a too-rare opportunity to take in Luigi Marchini’s exact lyricism, serializing his journey to Kilimanjaro. He made this pamphlet to raise money for DEMENTIA UK and, while the photographs support the empathic readers’ engagement, the poems are the main event.…

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Swimming with Endorphins by Fran Isherwood

– Reviewed by Emma Lee – The title of Swimming With Endorphins suggests that these will be light-hearted, punning poems that are fun to read. That’s what they are: a wry look at a common observation, ideas toyed with and explored for their humour. “Garden As Circus” watches a blackbird collecting berries balancing, fluttering, almost falling off fragile…

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Border Lines by Stuart A. Paterson

– Reviewed by Jessica Traynor – Border Lines is a work of psychogeography as much as poetry, making the topography of Galloway and Solway the site of varied poetic weather. This is a truly fluent poetry of place: lines unspool with the languid grace of moving clouds. Paterson’s tone is intimate and conversational, introducing the…