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The Nightwork by Peter Kenny

-Reviewed by Bethany W. Pope- Mythology always provides a rich seam for writers to draw from, especially when they uncover mythic resonances in their everyday lives. When the myths rise up through the skin of the world, the everyday minutiae of life is revealed as what it is: powerful and interesting. When forging the useable,…

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Mine by Holly Corfield Carr

-Reviewed by Harry Giles- Finding ways to document live performance is a perennial problem for the performing arts: watching a video of a show is rarely enthralling, and photographs and scripts usually fail to capture the sense of intimate action. Often documentation is used purely for marketing purposes, missing the maxim that “How we talk…

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Animaux Sacrés by Noni Benegas

-Reviewed by Claire Trévien- It’s an act of triple filtering to want to share the poetry of Noni Benegas, translated from Spanish into French, and now shared with you in English. Although an English translation of her poems, Burning Cartography, was published in 2007, I have to admit that it’s sheer luck while riffling through…

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Rivers Wanted by Rachel Piercey

-Reviewed by Jennifer Wong- It is hard not to fall in love with Rachel Piercey’s latest pamphlet, Rivers Wanted, with its quizzical, imaginative world at once familiar and strange; its sensitive, honest and playful language. The book begins with an intriguing confessional voice in ‘Hare': ‘Hare, in my mind, often frightens.’ Tracing the animal’s intuitiveness…

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Hannah, Are You Listening? by Hamish Whyte

-Reviewed by Rishi Dastidar-   ‘Charm’. And immediately, in front of your screens, I see your hackles rise, suspicion in your eyes. For ‘charm’ in the poetic context is dangerous. Very dangerous indeed. Here is a posit: that ‘charm’ is an even worse word to use in the description and criticism of poetry – even…

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Raspberries for the Ferry by Andrew Wynn Owen

-Reviewed by C.A. LaRue-   The last decade or so has seen a revival in formalism, especially amongst women and feminist poets. In an essay on the resurgence of received form (from The Body of Poetry (University of Michigan Press, 2005)) Annie Finch writes, “I can think of no more poignant a model for the…

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The Dead Snail Diaries by Jamie McGarry

 -Reviewed by Bethany W. Pope-             The Dead Snail Diaries, ostensibly co-written by Jamie McGarry and Snail, is a sweet, humorous collection that gently plays with the idea that a poet can only become known after they are dead. The set-up is simple and absurd; a student walking home (his head in the clouds) accidentally…

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The Ascent of Kinder Scout by Peter Riley

-Reviewed by David Clarke- It seems to me that there is a history yet to be written about the relationship between English poetry and walking. True, we have Rebecca Solint’s (notably non Anglo-centric) cultural history of walking, Wanderlust. But English poets are so often explorers of the landscape on foot, and write about that exploration…

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The Great Vowel Shift by Robin Houghton

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- Robin Houghton’s chapbook, beautifully produced by Telltale Press, is an engaging collection of amuse-bouches, alternating droll, ‘slant’ narratives with subtle poignancy. Houghton’s preferred form is long-lined stanzas usually two or three lines in length, although there is pleasing variety. Her voice is clear and unaffected. The poems are accessible enough to…