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Lampshades & Glass Rivers by S. A. Leavesley

– Reviewed by Rachel Stirling – S. A. Leavesley explores loss and living in her new pamphlet Lampshades & Glass Rivers. Her work is both stark and delicate, skirting the edges of the unsaid. She turns again and again to themes of light and perception, beating out a pulse of pain in a way that…

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A Career in Accompaniment by Alex Reed

– Reviewed by Neil Elder – If you read poetry regularly, you are probably aware that it offers a wonderful way to draw attention to aspects of the world that might otherwise be taken for granted. Alex Reed’s A Career in Accompaniment absolutely does this. Reed’s twenty eight poems – though some are just a few lines long…

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Year of the Ingénue by Michael Naghten Shanks

– Reviewed by Jenna Clake – Michael Naghten Shanks’ Year of the Ingénue is fascinated with cinema, and is divided into seasons, a structure employed frequently in films and television. It follows an ingénue, Imogen White, alongside a figure called ‘S’, and includes surreal, Lynchian interludes. The opening poem, ‘Seeing’, introduces the pamphlet’s cinematic approach: On the…

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(the book of seals) by Mark Russell

– Reviewed by Sarah Watkinson – The Book of Seals is a hugely enjoyable read, like an evening in the company of an erudite, soothsaying, greedy, slightly drunk, linguistically gifted sage. Composed of a long sequence of poems, untitled but each headed by a mysterious typographical symbol, its themes of gourmet cuisine, political dystopia and…

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Wound by Richard Scott

– Reviewed by Bethany W Pope – Richard Scott’s Wound opens with two epigraphs, one directly above the other, both centred on the page. The first and uppermost comes from Walt Whitman: ‘Through you I drain the pent up rivers of myself’. The second, buried beneath the first like an unconscious thought, belongs to Michael…

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Trouble by Alison Winch

– Reviewed by Jessica Traynor – Alison Winch’s Trouble is published by the Emma Press, and is an object befitting the quality of the work inside: beautifully designed and approachable, these pamphlets beg to be picked up and perused. A glowing introduction by Sarah Howe also proves enticing. Winch is a lecturer in Media Studies, and her…

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The Red and Yellow Nothing by Jay Bernard

– Reviewed by Fiona Moore – The Red and Yellow Nothing is the story of a quest… or is it, and if so, for what? Jay Bernard has unearthed an Arthurian tale from a Middle Dutch poem of possible French origin, translated into English a century ago. Sir Agloval, a knight travelling in Moorish lands,…

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Echolocation by Becky Cherriman

– Reviewed by Edward Ferrari – Dr Teika Bellamy of Mother’s Milk Books has made some tremendously good design decisions with Becky Cherriman’s Echolocation: a minimalistic, but expertly composed cover image, and skilful use of two contrasting fonts, make this volume very attractive. It’s gratifying that an equal amount of attention must have been given to editing the poems…