Strangers in Paris: New Writing Inspired by the City of Lights

-Reviewed by Claire Trevien- Strangers in Paris is an anthology of Anglophone poetry and fiction inspired by the city of lights. The unifying thread varies depending on the writer, from writings where Paris is part of the fabric, to writings set outside of the city but written while in Paris, such as Isabel Harding’s Zombie…

Superbard and Harry Baker, Edinburgh Previews @ the Brockley Jack Theatre

-Reviewed by James Webster and Dana Bubulj- Harry Baker (‘s Super-Amazing Mega-Awesome Gap Year Adventures: Birth of a Champion) He started out as a rapper, rapping about maths and geekery he didn’t quite fit into the ‘gangster’ mould, and he began his transformation into slam poet upon attending his first performance poetry event at the Edinburgh Festival. Soon after he…

Utter Nutters @ the Green Note Cafe 07/06/11

-Reviewed by James Webster and Dana Bubulj- Dear Utter: Spoken Word, Re: Your ‘Utter Nutters’ event, 06/07/11 I apologise that it has taken me so long to write this review, Utter, but, well, I’ve been dreading it. You see, I like writing reviews, I like trying to capture a poet’s style and performance. But I had such…

‘From There To Here’ by Michael Mackmin

-Reviewed by Chris Emslie- The poems in this pamphlet are presented in the style of a gallery of paintings. From There To Here might best be characterised as a series of landscapes, interrupted by the odd portrait or sketch, but all bearing Mackmin’s distinct signature. There is a vividness to these poems that almost begs to…

‘Do Not Pass Go’ Crime Stories by Joel Lane

-Reviewed by Richard T. Watson- ‘Do not pass go’ has been chosen as the title for Joel Lane’s short story pamphlet, the first in the new Hotwire imprint by Nine Arches Press. But that other Monopoly phrase, ‘Go to Jail’, would have been just as suitable; for these are works of crime fiction and throughout…

‘The Tradesman’s Entrance’ by Cameron Vale

-Reviewed by Ian Chung- If humour writing were crossed with erotica, one imagines the result would read something like Cameron Vale’s The Tradesman’s Entrance, a novelette from independent publisher Vagabondage Press. The ‘About Us’ page at the publisher’s website states that they ‘dislike the tendency in mainstream publishing to categorize and pigeonhole authors and their…

Mudluscious #16

-Reviewed by Caroline Crew- Content over style. Exactly how worn out is the idiom style over substance? Probably entirely. However it is a balance we have to work with and online literary magazines really seem to bring out this tension. None more so than Mud Luscious Press’ quarterly offering, Mudluscious. While MLP’s site is all…

‘What To Do’ by Kirsten Irving

 -Reviewed by Chris Emslie- Kirsten Irving’s What To Do is deceptively titled. The poems in this pamphlet present a series of speakers, each one snapped at a crucial moment. Whether this moment is one of crisis or epiphany, these characters are certainly in need of guidance. Rather than address this pressing question of ‘what to do’, Irving focuses…

‘Twelve Nudes’ by Ross Sutherland

-Reviewed by Joshua Jones- The first poem in Twelve Nudes, a three part prose poem, is quite simply a Luke Kennard poem. If I or anyone else familiar with Kennard’s work had read it without knowing the author, I imagine they would immediately have attributed it to him. It is enjoyable, surreal, absurd, funny; but…

‘All Safe All Well’ by Caleb Klaces

-Reviewed by Vikki Littlemore- As a collection, Caleb Klaces’ All Safe All Well feels steeped in necromantic images that create an other-worldly miasma made-up substantially of speech; spoken by who, we don’t know, and often reflecting the awkward, imperfect patterns of naturally spontaneous conversation.  The collection opens with an unidentified speaker; ‘A lot of the…