Tag Archives: Richard T. Watson

The Flood - Superbard

Fiction Round-Up 2013

-Compiled by Richard T. Watson- We have a Christmas tradition of sorts at Sabotage: to post a festive round-up of the year’s highlights in December, and to start by (mis)quoting that carol about it being the season to be jolly. And what is Christmas without its twee traditions? So here goes, 365 days from the…

Best European Fiction 2014 Dalkey Archives

Best European Fiction 2014

-Reviewed by Richard T. Watson- Perhaps the first question raised by the Dalkey Archives Press‘ newest collection, Best European Fiction 2014, is: what is European fiction? What are the characteristics that define it against, say, American fiction? In such a varied continent, ranging from Portugal to Russia, Iceland to Greece, and a continent with so…

‘Sweet Home’ by Carys Bray

-Reviewed by Richard T. Watson- Few of us can remember our childhoods vividly and clearly, every memory of every day as clear as, say, last week. We’re not necessarily consciously selective in our memories, but we do tend to hold onto the highlights and lowlights to stitch together some sort of narrative of our early…

‘Lovers’ Lies’ (ed. Katy Darby and Cherry Potts)

-Reviewed by Richard T. Watson- With a colourful, cheerful front cover, somewhat at odds with its ominous, dark-sounding title, Lovers’ Lies is a varied and multi-faceted anthology from Arachne Press. The lies – or stories – have all been contributed by members of the Liars’ League monthly events held in London (with franchises in Leeds,…

Saboteur Awards 2013: Fiction

-In which Richard T. Watson sums up the Fiction side of the Saboteur 2013 Awards- The first of the Fiction stable’s awards was for the Best Short Story Collection by a single author. Four out of five nominees were traditionally-printed books, while one (Superbard’s The Flood) was designed specifically for the iPad and featured a…

‘Controller’ by Sally Ashton

-Reviewed by Richard T. Watson- In the absence of words and common language, much of human communication happens through non-verbal means: body language, gestures and looks, for example. So it seems right that Sally Ashton’s debut novella, Controller, which follows its protagonist into an alien and foreign city whose language she learns as she goes…