Tag Archives: Harry Giles

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The Fruit Journal by Tom Watts

-Reviewed by Harry Giles- The Fruit Journal presents so completely as an academic journal – mid-seventies cover design and typography, diagrammatic images, the wry full title Understanding Foetal States In Uteri: A Fruit Journal of Prenatal Development – as to feel like a trick, a joke, a smuggling of poetry under plain covers. As an…

‘Visa Wedding’ by Harry Giles

-Reviewed by Donald Gardner- What makes Harry Giles’s first pamphlet of poetry stand out is its concentration and humour. There are not many words wasted here and if this tautness gives the work a bit of a Spartan feel, the wit restores it to warmth. He is a poet of intent and each of these…

Cerise Press: Fall/Winter 2012-13 (Vol. 4 Issue 11)

-Reviewed by Harry Giles-   One of the things I appreciate most about web journals is their architectural nature: where a book is a linearly curated experience, themes developing more or less rationally, a well-built website is more obviously a co-curation between editor and reader, with multiple pathways and directions of reading readily available. Every…

Published Poetry 2012: a Top 10

-Listed by Claire Trévien- As the end of the year approaches, it is customary to attempt round-ups of sorts. Last year, I asked for people’s favourite poetry pamphlets on twitter. This year I will be taking inspiration from last year’s fiction top ten and providing links to the top ten most read published poetry reviews…

Edinburgh Reviews Day 6 part 2 (06/08/12): Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard Tyrone Jones’s Big Heart, Flea Circus Open Slam

- reviewed by James Webster and Dana Bubulj – This week Sabotage’s Performance Editor James Webster, and contrary reviewer Dana Bubulj, are up in Edinburgh taking in the Fringe Festival. While they’re there, they are trying to review as much Spoken Word as they possibly can, as well as a few other things that catch…

‘Fleck and the Bank’ by Rob A. Mackenzie

        -Reviewed by Harry Giles-   Rob A. Mackenzie’s wee book, from the Salt Modern Voices series, is a tight, clear, wry piece of wonder, and a great use of the pamphlet form. Its small and simple purpose to “make partial sense” of the author’s absent friend, Fleck is made loud and deep by being…