‘Hellhound On My Trail’ by D. J. Butler

-Reviewed by Ian Chung- In Hellhound on My Trail, the first instalment of his Rock Band Fights Evil pulp fiction serial, D. J. Butler introduces us to a motley crew of musicians engaged in a battle with the powers of darkness. Clocking in at ten chapters, the installment makes for a quick but highly entertaining…

N.O.N.C.E. – Steve Larkin

@ The North Wall Arts Centre, Oxford – reviewed by Paul Askew – The Performer: Steve Larkin is a bit of a legend of the Oxford poetry scene. In fact, some would say he’s the reason Oxford has a poetry scene. He set up and ran the infamous Hammer & Tongue night, which has now…

‘Poland At The Door’ by Evelyn Posamentier

-Reviewed by Ian Chung- Reading Evelyn Posamentier’s Knives Forks and Spoons chapbook Poland At The Door, which Michael Heller describes on the back cover as ‘resembl[ing] a series of atomized clusters’, I was reminded of the poetry of Paul Celan, whose later poems especially were often similarly short and compressed. The work of both poets…

Poetry Jam @ The Tea Box 13/01/2012

- reviewed by Claudia Haberberg – By the time I arrive at the Poetry Jam, the Tea Box is already full to bursting. Had my friend not arrived some time before me, I wouldn’t be able to sit down. The organisers – Anna Le and Amy Acre, of the equally popular Sage & Time –…

‘Frankie, Alfredo’ by Liane Strauss

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- To read Liane Strauss’s poems is to sharpen your mind, deliciously. This chapbook is full of witty, clever, wry poems, which build up the impression of a consciousness resisting vulnerability, developing a sassy voice in response to perceived ‘sour grapes’: ‘you, full of voluptuous objection, / because my verses spill over…

‘The Glutton’s Daughter’ by Sinéad Wilson

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- Wit and clarity are two words I’d associate with Sinéad Wilson’s chapbook, The Glutton’s Daughter. Her opening poem, a sonnet, reflects the formality of religious rituals through the ‘litany of quiet names: altar, vestment/chancel, nave’, in a poem where the adolescent speaker hopes ‘for something bordering on proof from the young…

Beaconsfield Reading Series – Poetry and Wine 23/11/2011

-reviewed by James Webster- @ Royal Standard of England There’s something wonderfully quaint about Claire Trévien’s Beaconsfield based poetry night. Maybe it’s the gorgeous surroundings of the Royal Standard of England (oldest alehouse in England apparently) with its warren of low-ceilinged rooms. Maybe it’s the charmingly mixed audience, comprising all different ages and a mix…