Tag Archives: Afric McGlinchey

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Saboteur Awards 2014: Published Poetry

-In which Claire Trévien sums up the categories she presented at the awards- Best Poetry Pamphlet The poetry pamphlet was a very strong field pitting début pamphlets by rising stars such as Harry Man, Kathleen Bell and Rebecca Tamás against veterans Lisa Matthews, and W.N. Herbert. Kathleen Bell’s  At the Memory Exchange, was described by…

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Saboteur Awards 2014 – Results!

For a more in-depth account of each awards, click here for poetry, here for fiction, and here for performances! You can also check out the storify here to get a feel for the night. In the meantime, here are the results: Best Anthology Winner: Weird Lies, ed. Cherry Potts and Katy Darby (Arachne Press) Runner-Up: The Apple Anthology,…

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Saboteur Awards 2014: The Shortlist!

Vote now! The results will be announced at the Awards on 31st May, book tickets now!   Over the course of a month, over 600 of you have nominated in twelve categories, proving that indie lit is alive and well… As usual, we have been impressed by the breadth of your choices – but it’s…

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The Bastille #2 (Summer 2013)

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- The Bastille is an independent literary magazine published by the non-profit organization, Spoken Word, in Paris.  This journal gives us more than a ‘vertical understanding of poetry’, as Heaney put it. Here we have tripwire imaginations letting loose on the page, doodles and caricatures, gravity-free, tipsy, somersaulting poems. There’s diversity too…

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Hellsteeth by Jessamine O’Connor

 -Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- Jessamine O’Connor is a relatively recent name to appear in the Irish poetry world, and after winning and being shortlisted in a number of competitions, she’s one to watch. The repertoire in her début chapbook, Hellsteeth is often physical, the poems populated by the elderly, the newborn, and everyone in between, as…

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‘The Only Reason for Time’ by Fiona Moore

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey-   After the premature death of a lover, it would be easy to succumb to a tidal wave of bitterness and anguish.  But, unlike Auden’s famous ‘Funeral Blues’ poem, where, in a rapture of grief, he exhorts the world to ‘stop all the clocks,  cut off the telephone’, Moore is more…

‘The Silence Teacher’ by Robert Peake

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- The Silence Teacher explores the impact of an infant’s death, and the way perception is permanently altered as a result. Surviving for only a day, Peake’s newborn has left his ghost lodged in his father’s heart and mind. The child’s potential life, and associations with Peake’s own childhood, come crowding in, to…