Tag Archives: Afric McGlinchey

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The Bastille #2 (Summer 2013)

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- The Bastille is an independent literary magazine published by the non-profit organization, Spoken Word, in Paris.  This journal gives us more than a ‘vertical understanding of poetry’, as Heaney put it. Here we have tripwire imaginations letting loose on the page, doodles and caricatures, gravity-free, tipsy, somersaulting poems. There’s diversity too…

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Hellsteeth by Jessamine O’Connor

 -Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- Jessamine O’Connor is a relatively recent name to appear in the Irish poetry world, and after winning and being shortlisted in a number of competitions, she’s one to watch. The repertoire in her début chapbook, Hellsteeth is often physical, the poems populated by the elderly, the newborn, and everyone in between, as…

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‘The Only Reason for Time’ by Fiona Moore

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey-   After the premature death of a lover, it would be easy to succumb to a tidal wave of bitterness and anguish.  But, unlike Auden’s famous ‘Funeral Blues’ poem, where, in a rapture of grief, he exhorts the world to ‘stop all the clocks,  cut off the telephone’, Moore is more…

‘The Silence Teacher’ by Robert Peake

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- The Silence Teacher explores the impact of an infant’s death, and the way perception is permanently altered as a result. Surviving for only a day, Peake’s newborn has left his ghost lodged in his father’s heart and mind. The child’s potential life, and associations with Peake’s own childhood, come crowding in, to…

‘Flying into the Bear’ by Chrissy Williams

  -Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey-   There is an extravagance of imagery in Chrissy Williams’ Flying into the Bear, as the title suggests. These are poems that storm barricades, resisting definition, although they may break down ‘against the shore, the shore, the shore’ (‘The Bear of the Artist’). One important aspect of the imaginative flight or…

‘Etruscan Miniatures’ by Tim Cumming

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- I love poets who are also visual artists – it brings something extra to their work. Tim Cumming, who was born in an orphanage and grew up in the West Country in England, is a film-maker and painter as well as a poet. This beautiful chapbook, produced by an Australian publisher,…

‘Tusitala of white lies’ by Iain Britton

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- I was interested in this chapbook, by a New Zealander, because of the potential of  its culturally different image-base, approach and perception, and also because the physicality of the chapbook is  satisfyingly aesthetic. Immediately, the title arouses curiosity. What is Tusitala? It is, Google advises, both the name for a spider,…

‘Threadbare Fables’ by Ian Seed

-Reviewed by Afric McGlinchey- One definition of ‘fable’ is: ‘a short, allegorical narrative making a moral point.’ As this word is used in the title, I found myself looking for the moral point of each fable. These unusual prose poems – or fables – appear to be fragmented, but chronological, moments from the life of…