‘Count from Zero to One Hundred’ by Alan Cunningham

-Reviewed by Nick Sweeney- In Count from Zero to One Hundred, Alan Cunningham opens windows into a life in transit, into a mind that is only at times happy with the distortions and indecisions it produces. It is an interrupted life, with repetitions doomed not to reach any fruition, though there is sometimes a sense…

Annexe Magazine’s ‘Introducing’ Series

-Reviewed by Charles Whalley- All three beautiful pamphlets in Annexe Magazine’s ‘Introducing’ series are very small (A6) and very short (12 pages). They are: The Audience Member by Amber Massie-Blomfield, which is short fiction; Selected Poems by Charlotte Newman and The Histories by Michael C. Schuller, which are poetry. The Audience Member by Amber Massie-Blomfield…

‘Treasure in the History of Things’ by Katherine McMahon

  -Reviewed by Dana Bubulj- Published by Stewed Rhubarb Press, Treasure in the History of Things by Katherine McMahon (of the Inky Fingers collective) is a gorgeous pamphlet of twelve poems, complete with an audio CD of them performed accompanied with the occasional music and atmospheric sound-base. McMahon really impressed us when we caught her…

Oxford Poetry XIV.2 (Winter 2012)

-Reviewed by Claire Trévien- It’s a compliment to say that Oxford Poetry, one of the oldest poetry magazines of its kind (113 years old to be precise), does not look its age. The cover may be quietly unassuming, in a vintage picnic basket kind of way, but the list of contributors reads like a who’s…

‘The Escape Artists’ by Ben Parker

-Reviewed by James Webster- Ben Parker’s debut pamphlet from Tall Lighthouse is beautifully and disconcertingly not-quite-familiar. Approaching familiar objects and ideas through a variety of unsettling and alien lenses that make the everyday unfamiliar, it is thoughtful, funny and full of inventive expression. And no poem in the collection embodies this more than ‘The Restaurant’…

‘The Necropolis Boat’ by Luke Kennard

-Reviewed by Andrew Bailey- Luke Kennard’s The Necropolis Boat has a subtitle that offers a handy way in to the sequence: “Five songs and a tortured context”. Let’s trust that. Let’s start with the songs. Each is titled ‘The Great Necropolis Songbook’, from #1 to #5, and most use the kind of end-stopping rhymes that…

‘This Jealous Earth’ by Scott Dominic Carpenter

-Reviewed by Ian Chung- This Jealous Earth is Scott Dominic Carpenter’s first collection of short stories, and it is also the first title to launch for MG Press, the publishing arm of Midwestern Gothic. Both literary journal and micro-press share the same core values of ‘shining a spotlight on Midwest authors by focusing on works…

Interview with Scott Dominic Carpenter (This Jealous Earth)

-Scott Dominic-Carpenter spoke to Ian Chung- Scott Dominic Carpenter teaches literature and critical theory at Carleton College (MN), where he has written extensively on the representation of madness in the novel, political allegory, and literary hoaxes. His fiction has appeared in such journals as Chamber Four, Ducts, Midwestern Gothic, The MacGuffin, Prime Number and Spilling…